Bachelorette Party – Clean, Sober and Cheap

I recently helped plan the bachelorette party for my sister in law. We were faced with a challenge though – our party had to be kid-friendly, dairy free, low budget, and sober. The bride to be didn’t drink alcohol or consume dairy products, we were all broke and there was going to be about 6 kids under the age of 5 present. 

Our party started at 5, lasting about 3 hours. We had awesome music playing on the laptop as guests arrived. We picked three games, and one back up in case something went wrong. If its a long party, you might do more. There’s a list of my favorite games below.

Our party was at dinner time so we served pizza and drinks (soda and juice), getting a dairy free pizza from Papa Murphy’s. Surprisingly delicious and soooo convenient. Other good options would be BBQ chicken sandwiches in the crockpot, spaghetti or a burrito bar.

We couldnt afford decorations. Spending about $10 at the dollar store we put together party favors with candy and cute bows. Looking to go zero waste? Get cute coffee mugs and buy bulk candy to put inside – or bulk coffee.

All you other party planners might flinch at the idea of no decorations. But they weren’t necessary – they produce waste and cost money. And none of the guests even notoced. You dont need much for a kickass party!

Games

  • Flower arrangement contest /scavenger hunt in teams (fake or real flowers) – race to see which team finds all the flowers and puts them in the vase first.
  • Cold feet – fill a bowl with ice water and some costume jewelry rings. Tournament style – first person to fish out all the rings with their feet wins the round. Continue until you have a champion.
  • Pop! The Question – two teams. Attach two inflated balloons to everyones butt. No hands, no feet. The first team to pop everyone elses balloons wins.
  • Chocolate Unicorn – tournament style. Whoever stacks the most oreos on their forehead wins the round. No help, and you can’t hold the stack with your hands. Repeat until you have a champion.
  • Kiss the Bride – team pictionary, except the artist holds a tube of lipstick in their mouth to draw. No hands.
  • Junk in the trunk – teams or individual. Fill an empty tissue box with ping pong balls. Attach the box to your butt. First person to shake out all the balls wins. No hands!
  • Blind Love – blindfold one person. Have them do someone else’s makeup. Best makeup artist wins.

Ways to Save More Money

  • Have guests bring food and drinks.
  • Don’t provide prizes or party favors.

What’s your favorite party game?

What We Actually Needed for Baby: Zero Waste Style

*This post contains affiliate links, where I recieve a portion of your purchase at no extra cost to you. All affiliate links are to products I have actually used. 

Raising a baby requires a lot of crap. And if you go mainstream it requires an absurd amount of crap. Every child is different; every lifestyle, climate and laundry schedule are different too. But it is helpful as a new parent to see what other moms did.

Whether you’re a new mom or not, if you want to raise your child with a minimalist and zero waste attitude, this checklist is for you. Below you will find all the things we actually needed for our little Pudge’s first year, as we pursued a zero waste and minimalist lifestyle.

Keep in mind lifestyle differences as you read – I have full access to a washer and dryer, I breastfeed, Pudge comes to work with me so my pumping needs are limited, and I live in a spastic climate with extreme cold and hot weather.

Items in green were absolute necessities – everything else just made life easier.

Diapering

  • Cloth wipes. We have enough to fill 4 quart size mason jars because I’m paranoid about running out. This lasts 2- 3 days.
  • 30 reuseable cloth diaper liners/inserts.
  • 25 cloth diaper covers. Our Pudge had bad diahrea from antibiotics so we would go through up to 12 a day.
  • Spritzer bottle with DIY wipes solution.
  • Mason jar.
  • Small jar with DIY diaper rash cream.
  • Diaper changing pad/waterproof blanket.
  • 2 small portable wet bags.
  • 2 large wet bags that fit diaper pail.
  • Diaper pail.

Bathing

  • Two towels
  • 3 soft washcloths
  • Baby castille soap
  • Baby lotion
  • Water pitcher

Feeding

I breastfeed. If your planning on formula feeding or doing a combination of the two this list will need alterations. If you have the choice, always breastfeed exclusively. Its better for you, your baby and the planet. And your wallet!

  • 2 glass bottles
  • Electric pump
  • Pumping bra
  • Bottle brush
  • Dishwasher bottle basket
  • Castille soap for washing bottles
  • 304 steel pot for sterilizing pumping supplies, bottles and pacifiers.
  • Reuseable milk storage
  • Insulated cooler and ice packs for transporting milk.
  • Nursing pillow and washable cover
  • Lasinoh cream for your nipplies
  • Reuseable WATERPROOF nursing pads (if theyre not lined with waterproof material on the back you’ll leak right through them).
  • 2 nursing bras
  • Clothes you can nurse in public in – stretchy T-shirts, loose sweaters and low tank tops work great and are cheap. Or get the amaaaazing nursing sweater I have.
  • Nursing cover (if you’re uncomfortable in public).
  • Prenatal vitamins for mom.

Moving on to solids between 4- 6 months, you will also need:

  • Whole foods – bananas, squash, etc.
  • Small mason jars for prepped food – these will also freeze.
  • Lunchbox for on the go.
  • Potato masher.
  • Teething bags (stuff it with frozen berries. Seriously, no orajel needed).
  • 4 Bibs

Bedtime

  • 3 Velcro swaddles (these saved my life – seriously. I wasn’t going to buy any but one was given to me and I loved them so much I bought two backups)
  • Two heavy blankets
  • Two medium blankets
  • Two light blankets
  • 6 recieving blankets (these double as burp rags)

Clothes (year one)

In the spirit of zero waste, buy as much of these used as possible. For when you can’t, I’ve provided links to organic cotton clothing that can be passed down until it’s ready to be composted.

  • 10 newborn onesies – 5 long sleeve, 5 short sleeve.
  • 2 newborn hats.
  • 10 newborn pairs of pants.
  • 2 newborn light zip up footie pajamas.
  • 2 newborn heavy zip up footie pajamas.
  • 20-40 pairs of 0-3 month socks (Dont waste money on newborn ones).
  • 2 pairs of 0-3 month booties (only if it’s really cold).
  • 0-3 month snowsuit (only if it’s really cold).
  • 10 0-3 month onesies – 5 long sleeve, 5 short sleeve.
  • 2 0-3 month hats.
  • 10 0-3 month pairs of pants.
  • 2 0-3 month light zip up footie pajamas.
  • 2 0-3 month heavy zip up footie pajamas.
  • 20-40 pairs of 3-6 month socks.
  • 2 pairs of 3-6 month booties (only if it’s really cold).
  • 3-6 month snowsuit (only if it’s really cold).
  • 8 3-6 month onesies – 4 long sleeve, 4 short sleeve.
  • 2 3-6 month hats.
  • 8 3-6 month pairs of pants.
  • 2 3-6 month light zip up footie pajamas.
  • 2 3-6 month heavy zip up footie pajamas.
  • 20-40 pairs of 6- 18 month socks.
  • 2 pairs of 6-18 month booties (only if it’s really cold).
  • 1 6- 9 month snowsuit (only if it’s really cold).
  • 8 6- 9 month onesies – 4 long sleeve, 4 short sleeve.
  • 2 6- 9 month hats.
  • 8 6- 9 month pairs of pants.
  • 2 6- 9 month light zip up footie pajamas.
  • 2 6- 9 month heavy zip up footie pajamas
  • 20-40 pairs of 18- 24 month socks.
  • 2 pairs of 18- 24 month booties (only if it’s really cold).
  • 1 9- 12 month snowsuit (only if it’s really cold).
  • 8 9- 12 month onesies – 4 long sleeve, 4 short sleeve.
  • 2 9- 12 month hats.
  • 8 9- 12 month pairs of pants.
  • 2 9- 12 month light zip up footie pajamas.
  • 2 9- 12 month heavy zip up footie pajamas
  • Dirty clothes basket
  • Baby safe stain remover
  • Baby/cloth diaper safe laundry soap
  • Net bag for washing socks in (so your machine doesn’t eat them)

Gear

  • Convertible car seat
  • Stroller and rain shield
  • Car mirror (so you can see baby)
  • Car window covers
  • Diaper bag (if you’re not using your purse)
  • Convertible crib. In the United States you are legally required to provide your baby an age aplropriate bed with a frame.
  • Highchair or other seating while eating device.
  • Somewhere to keep clothes off the floor; Baskets, bookshelves and dressers all work.
  • Boba wrap or baby carrier

Playtime/Learning

  • Hand-held rattle
  • Two stuffed toys (ours sing)
  • Foot rattles
  • Rings
  • Books to read (As many as you feel is apropriate)

Misc.

  • Pacifiers and clips
  • Nail clippers
  • Hairbrush
  • Missing persons kit
  • Waterproof file for important documents

Baby Health

  • Forehead thermometer.
  • Lavendar vaporub for colds.
  • Nasal aspirator (there are different sizes – get all of them).
  • Syringe for medications/vitamins.
  • Infant tylenol.
  • Peppermint tea (for belly aches).

What did your baby need?

This is part two of a series on raising a zero waste family.

Part One

Part Two

Chicken Pot Pie

I had serious doubts about this recipe at first. I was just throwing things together, trying to come up with something edible and packed full of veggies. And while this definitely isn’t a traditional pot pie, trust me – you’ll never go back to Marie Calendars again.

Makes 6 servings; 1 13×9 casserole dish

You Will Need:

  • 1 tbsp + Bacon grease (or butter)
  • 1 large onion
  • 3 cloves minced garlic
  • 1.25 lbs chicken meat, cut into 1 inch cubes
  • 1 tbsp + Poultry seasoning blend
  • Handful of celery leaves (or 2 ribs)
  • 1 cup chopped carrots
  • 3 cups  1/2 inch diced potatoes
  • 1 ear of corn kernels (or half a can)
  • 1 20oz can condensed cream of chicken
  • Salt and pepper to taste
  • 2 pie crust boxes (4 crusts)
  • Garlic salt

In a large pot melt 1 tbsp bacon grease over medium high heat. Add onions and garlic, stirring often, until translucent.

Add cubed chicken, poultry seasoning, celery innards, carrots and potatoes. Stir occassionally, until chicken is cooked all the way through.

Reduce to low heat. Add corn, cream of chicken, and salt and pepper to taste. Thoroughly combine.

Preheat oven to 400.

Grease 13×9 glass pan with bacon grease.

Use two crusts for the bottom – prick with a fork and bake for 10 minutes.

Reduce oven to 350.

Pour filling over baked crust. Top with remaining two crusts. Poke with a fork.

Sprinkle garlic salt and poultry seasoning over crust. Cover with tinfoil.

Bake for 30 minutes.

Remove tinfoil. Bake 10-15 minutes until crust is golden.

Serve warm and enjoy 🙂

$50 Meal Plan #2

*UPDATE: This was originally posted in January on the old blog*

A meal plan, if it’s going to work, isn’t broken down into weekly measured portions and their associated costs. It’s a mix of this week’s purchases, what’s in your pantry, gifts and ground-scores.

So, following this format, I’m pitching in my budget. I spend $50-$75 a week on me and my husband (plus the weekly family dinner of 6 people, my younger siblings’ weekly visit, and all of the friends that come and devour my muffins. Every. Freaking. Day.)

But we have no other sources of food beyond our budget. No garden, herbs in the window sill – nothing. I use coupons sparingly – the store ad for wherever I’m shopping and coupons.com. Nothing complex. About 10 minutes a week and I save about $5 each shopping trip.

This hasn’t been the healthiest week for us. I’ve been working late nights so when I come home dinner is the last thing I want to do, and I can’t prep it in the morning because I’m doing homework in the mornings.

 

This week we bought:

Boneless skinless chicken breast (4 lbs.), ground turkey (2lbs.), mushroom-chicken sausage (1lbs.), beef ramen, coffee creamer, kale, lettuce, green onions, asparagus, bananas, 3lbs. bag of onions, yogurt, 2 boxes of cereal, and 1 jar of pasta sauce.

Meal-share Benefits with Family: 1 whole turkey and 3 goose eggs. My husband’s boss cleaned out his freezer.

From the Garden (and some Foraging): Morel mushrooms(!!) and dandelion greens from our yard (because I know they weren’t sprayed).

 

Breakfast Options:

Yogurt and granola

Frogs in a Hole

Oatmeal

 

Lunch Options:

Vegan Chili Verde

Cornbread

Turkey wraps

Sausage pasta with spinach (sausage+pasta+spinach+milk)

Leftovers

 

Snack Options:

Crackers

Granola bars

Fresh fruit

Crunchy roasted chickpeas

Quesadillas

Green salad

Pickled eggs (just throw boiled eggs in an empty pickle jar with leftover juice. One batch per pickle jar – refrigerate please)

French bread (homemade) and butter

Peanut butter edible cookie dough

Tea

Hot Cocoa

 

Dinner Menu:

Thursday  – Chicken curry with brown rice

Friday – Enchiladas

Saturday – Turkey and kale soup

Sunday – Ground beef ramen (ground beef+ramen+green onions) and salad

Monday – Turkey gravy over potatoes

Tuesday – Steak, garlic creamed pasta and asparagus

Wednesday – Turkey meatballs with marinara and fresh bread

 

Meal Prepping I did this week:

These foods were prepared over the course of the weekend. Some was stashed away for later and some was consumed this week.

  • 3 loaves of french bread
  • Turkey meatballs
  • 2 cups brown rice

This week’s total spent: $46.00 

 

How do you spend your grocery budget?

Roasted Maple Pecan Granola

maple pecan granolaNote: This was originally posted in 2013 on the first website. This is still one of my favorite recipes, and yes, it was my first recipe ever published. That was the good old days when I was still learning how to cook – I couldn’t even make an omelet!

Hi, guys. Yesterday was awesome, in a crazy sort of way. This week I’ve made chicken noodle soup completely from scratch, and hot cocoa with whipped cream. Last night I turned out two different batches of granola, and some lovely yogurt.

I’ve got a treat for you today: my very first recipe (that I’ve shared with the public)! It’s based off of Alana‘s book The Homemade Pantry, but I’ve changed it around a bit. I highly recommend the book. It’s awesome.

This is a very sweet granola. If you want a little less sugar, just add about 1/2 cup less syrup. If you only have one rimmed baking sheet, halve this recipe and you’ll be fine. Also, given the amount of time this takes, I suggest making it in the morning, or leaving it to cool in the oven overnight.

Now for the granola…

You will need:

  • 10 cups rolled oats
  • 2 cups chopped pecans
  • 1/2 tsp salt
  • 2 1/2 rounded tbsp ground cinnamon
  • 3/4 cup coconut oil
  • 1 1/2 cups maple syrup
  • 1/4 cup agave syrup (or more maple syrup)
  • 2 tsp vanilla extract (the real stuff is best)

Prepwork:

Preheat oven to 250 F. Put oven racks in top 2/3 of oven. Chop nuts.  

Mix:

Combine the oats, pecans, salt and cinnamon in a really big bowl. Mix thoroughly. In a separate, 4-cup bowl whisk together oil, syrup and vanilla extract until uniform. Pour syrup mixture into the oats mixture, and stir until everything’s coated. Don’t leave any dry or wet pockets.  

Bake:

Line two (or one, if you’re doing half a batch) 18 x 13″ rimmed baking sheets with wax or parchment paper. Spread the granola evenly on the pans. Put the pans in the oven and bake for 30 minutes. Take pans out, shuffle/stir granola, turn pan, and put back in oven for another 30 minutes. Take out the granola again, stir it, and put it back in the oven, but turn the oven off. Let granola cool for at least 6 hours or overnight in your oven (but leave the oven off).

Enjoy:

After your granola is done cooling, package some up and share it with your neighbors. Put the rest in an airtight container and store in a cool, dry place. Raisins or chocolate chips can be added, if you like. Have it in your yogurt, or with milk. This makes a great breakfast cereal. 

What was your first original recipe?

Preserving Fresh Garlic

Fresh garlic

Note: This post was originally published, on the previous website, in 2013.

I recently found myself with a fairly large amount of fresh garlic and realized that it wouldn’t last long enough for me to use all of it. I quite often buy garlic, dried, from the grocery store but I’ve never dealt with fresh garlic. And let me tell you, the smell alone of fresh garlic is simply sublime. But the taste… ooh baby~

So I’ve got a whole bunch of delicious, local, organic garlic and I don’t want it to go bad. The logical solution? Preserve it. Dry it, in this case.

Here’s how you can dry your own fresh garlic (from your own garden or the farmers market) yourself. It’s ridiculously easy. See how short this post is?

  1. Take a bunch of fresh garlic.
  2. Tie it up and hang it in a cool, dry place out of direct sunlight. Pantries are great for this.
  3. Let the garlic bundle dry there for a couple weeks (elephant garlic needs four weeks or more).
  4. When it’s dry store it in a cool, dry place. I keep mine in a basket on the counter (away from the stove). It’ll keep like that for months. Don’t put it in sunlight unless you want it to sprout.
  5. If your garlic does end up sprouting, plant it!

I think this is one of my favorite parts of gardening: preserving the harvest. It reminds me of Under the Tuscan Sun